Jan 18

Recently a group out of the Universtity of Chicago reported, in the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, that obstructive sleep apnea may adversely affect the body’s ability to control it’s sugar levels (glucose). This can lead to major problems with people that suffer from type 2, adult onset, diabetes.

Renee S. Aronsohn, MD, of the University of Chicago, said “for the first time that there is a clear, graded inverse relationship between [obstructive sleep apnea] severity and glucose control in patients with type 2 diabetes.”

John Heffner, MD, past president of the American Thoracic Society, said in a recent news release that at least 80% people with type 2 diabetes also have obstructive sleep apnea.

This study is encouraging because obstructive sleep apnea is a treatable condition. Hence, if the obstructive sleep apnea is treated the person’s ability to control his/her blood sugar levels would most likely improve.

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